Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Home Regions Campsites Penny Postcards My Corps of Discovery Image Index Links About This Site Birds etc.
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Roosevelt, Washington"
Includes ... Roosevelt ... North Roosevelt ... West Roosevelt ... Arlington-Roosevelt Ferry ... Campsite of October 20, 1805 ... Campsite of April 24, 1806 ...
Image, 2006, Roosevelt, Washington, from Interstate 84, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Roosevelt, Washington, from Interstate 84, Oregon. Image taken October 2, 2006.


Roosevelt ...
Roosevelt, Washington, is located on the Washington banks of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 244.5, directly across from Arlington, Oregon. Five miles downstream is the orchard community of Sundale. Roosevelt was named by T.B. Montgomery to honor Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States.

Image, 2004, Roosevelt, Washington, from Arlington, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Roosevelt, Washington, from Arlington, Oregon. Image taken September 24, 2004.


Campsite of October 20, 1805 ...
On the route map (Moulton, vol.1, map#86), Lewis and Clark's camp of October 20, 1805, is marked on the north bank of the Columbia just downstream of many islands in the river, at an upstream tip of flat bench below the high banks of the Columbia. Today this is near the location of the Grain Elevator at Roosevelt, Washington.

"... The river to day is about 1/4 of a mile in width; this evening the Countrey on the Lard. Side rises to the hight of that on the Starboard Side, and is wavering -- we made 42 miles to day; the current much more uniform than yesterday or the day before. ..." [Clark, October 20, 1805]

"... A fine clear frosty morning. We set out early; passed along a handsome part of the river ... At noon we came to an Indian camp on the point of a large island, where we stopped ... At 1 o'clock we proceeded on again, went 42 miles, and encamped without any of the natives being along, which is unusual on this river. We could not get a single stick of wood to cook with; and had only a few small green willows. ..." [Gass, October 20, 1805]

"... a clear frosty morning. we Set out eairly. proceeded on passed a pleasant part of the County level Smooth plains but no timber. the River Smooth. we Saw Some pilicans and abundance of ravens and crows, as the Shores are lined with dead Sammon. about 12 oClock we halted at a village to dine where we bought a fiew roots &C. and Saw among them a number of articles which came from white people. Such as copper kittles Scarlet &C. passed many rapid places of water. the country continues as yesterday our hunters who went in the small canoe killed nine ducks and a goose to day. we came 46 miles this day. and Camped on the Starbord Side no wood except a fiew Small willows. ..." [Ordway, October 20, 1805]

"... The appearance of the Country is the same as Yesterday. Our hunters killed 9 Ducks, & a goose this day in the River. In the evening we encamped on the North side of the River, where we found no other article to make fire with, but small sticks & green Willows. ..." [Whitehouse, October 20, 1805]

Lewis and Clark's previous campsite was located on the Oregon side near Irrigon, Oregon. Their camp of October 21, 1805, was downstream of today's John Day Dam.



Image, 2004, Grain elevator at North Roosevelt, Washington, from Arlington, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Grain elevator at Roosevelt, Washington, seen from Arlington, Oregon. Image taken September 24, 2004.


Campsite of April 24, 1806 ...
According to Captain Lewis's entry, the campsite of April 24, 1806, was two miles below their campsite of October 20, 1805. Today this would be just downstream of Roosevelt, across from Arlington, Oregon. The route map marks it at the downstream end of the bench.

"... we proceeded up the river between the hills and it's Northen shore.     the road was rocky and sandy alternately, the road difficult and fatieguing.     at 12 ms. we arrived at a village of 5 lodges of the Met-cow-wes, having passed 4 lodges at 4 and 2 Ms. further.     we ramined all night near the Met-cow-we lodges about 2 miles below our encampment of the [blank] of October last; ..." [Lewis, April 24, 1806]

"... at 1 P.M. Set out and proceeded on through a open Countrey rugid & Sandy between Some high lands and the river to a village of 5 Lodges of the Met-cow-we band haveing passed 4 Lodges at 4 miles and 2 Lodges at 6 miles. ... made 12 miles to day." [Clark, April 24, 1806]

"... At 2 o'clock we all started by land on the north side of the river ... We entered the low country, the great and beautiful plains of Columbia, and proceeded on till evening when we encamped at two mat-lodges of the natives ..." [Gass, April 24, 1806]

Lewis and Clark's previous camp was located upstream from the mouth of Rock Creek, Washington, and their camp of April 25, 1806, was near Alder Creek, Washington.


Image, 2005, Grain Elevator, Roosevelt, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Grain Elevator, Roosevelt, Washington. Image taken May 24, 2005.


Roosevelt Park ...
Roosevelt Park is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers park located on the west side of the town of Roosevelt, Washington.

Image, 2005, Grain Elevator, Roosevelt, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Roosevelt Park, Roosevelt, Washington. Image taken May 24, 2005.
Image, 2004, Roosevelt Park, Roosevelt, Washington, from downstream Arlington, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Roosevelt Park, Roosevelt, Washington, as seen from downstream Arlington, Oregon. Image taken September 26, 2004.


Arlington-Roosevelt Ferry ...
A ferry once connected Arlington, Oregon with Roosevelt, Washington.

From the 1942 U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor Coast and Geodetic Survey's "United State Coast Pilot, Pacific Coast", Serial No.649:

"Four ferries cross the Columbia River above The Dalles as follows: Biggs-Merryhill, 16 statute miles; Arlington-Roosevelt, 50 statute miles; Boulder-Alderdale, 65 statute miles; and Irrigon-Coolidge, 88 statute miles."

A passage from the 1940 publication "Oregon, End of the Trail", by the Works Projects Administration (WPA) of the State of Oregon:

"... The Arlington Ferry (cars, $1 ; round trip, $1.50) makes connections with Roosevelt, Wash. ..."

Views of Roosevelt ...

Image, 2004, North Roosevelt, Washington, from downstream Arlington, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Roosevelt, Washington, as seen from downstream Arlington, Oregon. Roosevelt Park is treed area at river's shore. Image taken September 26, 2004.
Image, 2004, Columbia River as seen from downstream Arlington, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River downstream of Roosevelt, Washington, seen from downstream Arlington, Oregon. Image taken September 26, 2004.
Image, 2004, Roosevelt, Washington, from Arlington, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River and Roosevelt, Washington, from Arlington, Oregon. Image taken September 24, 2004.
Image, 2004, Washington Banks of the Columbia, downstream Roosevelt, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Banks of the Columbia River, downstream of Roosevelt, Washington. View from downstream Arlington, Oregon. Image taken September 26, 2004.


Mount Hood, Oregon, from Roosevelt, Washington ...

Mount Hood, Oregon, one of the Cascade Range Volcanoes can be seen from Roosevelt, Washington.

Image, 2005, Mount Hood, Oregon, as seen from Roosevelt, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Hood, Oregon, as seen from Roosevelt, Washington. View taken from west of town. Image taken May 24, 2005.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 20, 1805 ...
A cool morning wind S. W. we concluded to delay untill after brackfast which we were obliged to make on the flesh of dog. after brackfast we gave all the Indian men Smoke, and we Set out leaveing about 200 of the nativs at our Encampment [near Irrigon, Oregon]; passd. three Indian Lodges on the Lard Side a little below our Camp [Irrigon, Oregon] which lodges <we> I did not discover last evening, passed a rapid at Seven miles one at a Short distance below we passed a verry bad rapid, a chane or rocks makeing from the Stard. Side and nearly Chokeing the river up entirely with hugh black rocks [Lewis and Clark called these rapids "Pelican Rapids"] an Island below close under the Stard. Side on which was four Lodges of Indians drying fish,- here I Saw a great number of pelicons on the wing, and black Comerants [American White Pelicans and Double-crested Cormorants]. at one oClock we landed on the lower point of <Some> an Island at Some Indian Lodges, a large Island on the Stard Side nearly opposit and a Small one a little below on the Lard Side on those three Island I counted Seventeen Indian Lodges, ...

[Lewis and Clark are passing through the Blalock Islands area. Today most of the islands are beneath the waters of Lake Umatilla, the reservoir behind the John Day Dam. In this vicinity are today's Boardman, Whitcomb Island, Canoe Ridge, slightly downstream is Crow Butte and historic Castle Rock, along with the many lands of the Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge.]

after diner we proceeded on to a bad rapid at the lower point of a Small Island on which four Lodges of Indians were Situated drying fish; here the high countrey Commences again on the Stard. Side [Alder Ridge] leaveing a vallie of 40 miles in width, from the mustle Shel rapid [Umatilla Rapids at the McNary Dam]. examined and passed this rapid close to the Island at 8 miles lower passed a large Island near the middle of the river a brook on the Stard. Side [Alder Creek] and 11 Islds. all in view of each other below, a riverlit [Willow Creek] falls in on the Lard. Side behind a Small Island a Small rapid below. The Star Side is high rugid hills [Alder Ridge], the Lard. Side a low plain and not a tree to be Seen in any Direction except a fiew Small willow bushes which are Scattered partially on the Sides of the bank

The river to day is about of a mile in width; this evening the Countrey on the Lard. Side [area around Arlington, Oregon] rises to the hight of that on the Starboard Side [Columbia Hills], and is wavering- we made 42 <days> miles to day [to Roosevelt, Washington]; the current much more uniform than yesterday or the day before. Killed 2 Speckle guls Severl. ducks of a delicious flavour.



Ordway, October 20, 1805 ...
a clear frosty morning. we Set out eairly. proceeded on passed a pleasant part of the County level Smooth plains but no timber. the River Smooth. we Saw Some pilicans and abundance of ravens and crows, as the Shores are lined with dead Sammon. about 12 oClock we halted at a village to dine where we bought a fiew roots &C. and Saw among them a number of articles which came from white people. Such as copper kittles Scarlet &C. passed many rapid places of water. the country continues as yesterday our hunters who went in the small canoe killed nine ducks and a goose to day. we came 46 miles this day. and Camped on the Starbord Side [near Roosevelt, Washington] no wood except a fiew Small willows.


Whitehouse, October 20, 1805 ...
The appearance of the Country is the same as Yesterday. Our hunters killed 9 Ducks, & a goose this day in the River. In the evening we encamped on the North side of the River, where we found no other article to make fire with, but small sticks & green Willows. We saw this day among the Natives, some Acorns, which they roasted & Eat, and some red Cloth, which appeared not to be long Imported from Europe.





Clark, April 24, 1806 ...
rose early this morning [their camp near Rock Creek, Washington] and Sent out after the horses ...     we purchased 3 horses, and hired 3 others of the Chopunnish man who accompanies us with his family, and at 1 P. M. Set out and proceeded on through a open Countrey rugid & Sandy between Some high lands and the river to a village of 5 Lodges of the Met-cow-we band haveing passed 4 Lodges at 4 miles and 2 Lodges at 6 miles. Great numbers of the nativs pass us on hors back maney meet us and Continued with us to the Lodges. we purchased 3 dogs which were pore, but the fattest we Could precure, and Cooked them with Straw and dry willow. we Sold our Canoes for a fiew Strands of beeds. the nativs had tantelized us with an exchange of horses for our Canoes in the first instance, but when they found that we had made our arrangements to travel by land they would give us nothing for them. we Sent Drewyer to Cut them up, he Struck one and Split her they discovered that we were deturmined to destroy the Canoes and offered us Several Strans of beeds which were acceptd most of the party Complain of their feet and legs this evening being very Sore. it is no doubt Causd. by walking over the rough Stone and deep Sand after being accustomed to a Soft Soil. my legs and feet give me much pain. I bathed them in Cold water from which I experienced Considerable relief. we directed that the 3 horses purchased yesterday should be hobbled and confined to pickquets and that the others Should be Hobbled & Spancled, and Strictly attended to by the guard made 12 miles to day. [camped downstream of Roosevelt, Washington, and across from Arlington, Oregon]





Columbia PlateauReturn to
Menu
 



SNAKE RIVER CONFLUENCE | COLUMBIA PLATEAU
COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE | VANCOUVER PLAINS | JOURNEY TO THE PACIFIC
CASCADE RANGE VOLCANOES | CAMPSITES


HOME | REGIONS | PENNY POSTCARDS | MY CORPS OF DISCOVERY
IMAGE INDEX | LINKS | ABOUT THIS SITE


COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES - HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY - HOME
NORTHWEST BIRDING
RIDGEFIELD NWR - BIRDS
COMPLETE BIRD LIST - PHOTOS
THE BARLOW ROAD
WILDFLOWERS and WEED BLOSSOMS



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources: Hitchman, R., 1985, Place Names of Washington, Washington State Historical Society.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/roosevelt.html
© 2013, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
September 2008