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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Lyle, Washington"
Includes ... Lyle ... "Klickitat Landing" ... Klickitat River ... "Twin Bridges" ... Missoula Floods ... Lyle-Balch Cemetery ... Lyle Convict Road ... The Golden Age of Postcards ...
Image, 2008, Lyle, Washington, from Rowena Crest, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lyle, Washington, from Rowena Crest, Oregon. Image taken August 23, 2008.


Lyle ...
Lyle, Washington, is located on the north bank of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 181, where the Klickitat River merges with the Columbia. Upstream of Lyle are the basalts of the Rowena Gap and Dougs Beach, a windsurfing and sailboarding location. Immediately downstream of Lyle is the mouth of the Klickitat River and Chamberlain Lake. Ten miles downstream of Lyle is the Washington community of Bingen. Immediately across from Lyle is Oregon's Mayer State Park and Rowena Crest.

Lewis and Clark and Lyle ...
Lewis and Clark stopped for supplies at Doug's Beach ("the friendly Village") on October 29, 1805, and then stopped in the Lyle area at a native village on the downstream side of the Klickitat River.

"... proceeded on    at 4 miles further we landed to Smoke a pipe with the people of a village of 11 houses     we found those people also friendly    Their Village is Situated imediately below the mouth of a River of 60 yards water which falls in on the Stard. Side and heads in the mountains to the N. & N, E, the Indians inform us that this river is long <but> and full of falls    no Salmon pass up it. ..." [Clark, October 29, 1805, first draft]

Image, 2015, Lyle, Washington, from Interstate 84, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Klickitat River and Lyle, Washington, from Interstate 84, Oregon. Image taken August 23, 2008.


Lyle and the Missoula Floods ...
Lyle is built on a huge Missoula Floods gravel bar. Stratigraphy in exposures of eddy deposits northwest and across the Klickitat River from Lyle show that MANY of the several floods passing by achieved stages of 600 feet.
[More]

Early Lyle ...
The original name for Lyle was "Klickitat Landing". Early settlers in the area used the steamboat landing for transporting sheep and cattle to market in Portland (see "The Golden Age of Postcards" below). The name was changed to "Lyle" when James O. Lyle purchased the claim of J.M. Williamson, and platted a townsite.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, show a James O. Lyle being issued a land title on August 28, 1878, for 107.27 acres of parts of T3N R12E Sections 33 and 34, under the 1820 "Sale-Cash Entry".


Image, 2014, Scenic, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lewis's Woodpecker, Lyle, Washington. Image taken March 12, 2014.

Lewis's Woodpecker was named after Captain Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis & Clark expedition, who first described the bird on July 20, 1805. He described the bird more in-depth on May 27, 1806. The Lewis and Clark expedition called the bird the "Black woodpecker".


Brief History ...

From the Lyle Community website, 2004:

"... Lyle is located along an ancient trading route frequented annually by many Indian tribes. The first known white men to visit the site were members of the Lewis and Clark expedition who recorded their visit to the Indian village on the knoll west of the Klickitat on October 29, 1805. In 1876, the first Post Office east of the Cascades and north of the Columbia River was established at Klickitat Landing to service most of Eastern Washington. The mail arrived by steamship and was distributed by horseback. In 1876, James O. Lyle became the Postmaster and changed the name of the community to Lyle. Early settlers recognized the strategic importance of Lyle and platted a town site. A ferry boat run was developed to accommodated trade between Oregon and Washington. In 1892, an English Lord Balfour purchased over a mile of river frontage and most of the land surrounding the town site of Lyle and built a mansion overlooking the Columbia west of the Klickitat River. The hillsides north of town were turned into vineyards and orchards. In 1903, the Columbia River & Northern Railroad was completed between Lyle and Goldendale. In 1908, when the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railroad was completed between Pasco and Portland, the company purchased the town of Lyle and also made the CR&N Railroad a branch line. In 1909, the present town of Lyle was platted. Two sheep sheds with a capacity of 30,000 sheet were constructed on the Point. With those in place, Lyle became an important sheep and wool shipping center. Until 1933, when the tunnels were blasted through the rock walls east of town and State Highway 14 was constructed, Lyle's only road access was by bridge over the Klickitat River, then up the hill toward White Salmon and other communities to the north." ..."


Scenics ...

Image, 2014, Scenic, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Scenic, Lyle, Washington. Image taken March 12, 2014.
Image, 2012, Mount Hood from Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood as seen from Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2012.
Image, 2017, Mount Hood near Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood as seen from near the Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken May 8, 2017.
Image, 2017, Near Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Fence near Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken May 8, 2017.


Street Scenes ...

Image, 2013, Street Scene, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2013.
Image, 2013, Street Scene, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Pepsi sign, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2013.
Image, 2013, Street Scene, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Twin Bridges Historical Museum sign, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2013.


Lyle, etc.

  • Balch Lake ...
  • Klickitat River and the "Twin Bridges" ...
  • Klickitat Wagon Road ...
  • Lyle-Balch Cemetery ...
  • Lyle-Balch Church and Schoolhouse ...
  • Lyle Convict Road ...
  • Lyle Hotel ...
  • Lyle to Rowena Ferry ...
  • Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission ...
  • Mosier Syncline ...
  • Syncline Winery ...
  • Trains and Tunnels ...
  • Twin Bridges Museum ...
  • Views of Lyle from across the Columbia ...


Balch Lake ...
Balch Lake lies within the eastern half of T3N R12E, Section 29. Balch Lake was named after the Balch family which settled in the area north of Balch Lake. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records database (2017) shows Harriet M. Balch, the mother of "Bridge of the Gods" author Frederic Homer Balch, being granted title to 160 acres of T3N R12E, Section 20, on September 13, 1889 (1862 Homestead Entry Original).

Image, 2017, Balch Lake, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Balch Lake, Lyle, Washington. Image taken May 8, 2017.
Image, 2017, Balch Lake, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Balch Lake, Lyle, Washington. Image taken May 8, 2017.


Klickitat River and the "Twin Bridges" ...
The community of Lyle is located on the left bank (east side) of the Klickitat River at its junction with the Columbia. Two bridges, locally known as the "Twin Bridges", cross the mouth of the Klickitat River at Lyle. The lower railroad bridge was built in 1908 and the upper Highway 14 bridge was built in 1933. Both are concrete open-spandrel arch bridges.
[More]

Image, 2010, Klickitat River, Washington, click to enlarge
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Klickitat River and the "twin bridges", as seen from Rowena Crest, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2010.
Image, 2015, Klickitat River, Washington, click to enlarge
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Klickitat River, Washington, looking downstream. View from trailhead, left bank, upstream from mouth, showing the "Twin Bridges". Image taken September 26, 2015.


Klickitat Wagon Road ...
Before the "Twin Bridges".

Image, 2015, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Display, Klickitat Wagon Bridge, 1915, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington. Image taken September 26, 2015.

"Old Klickitat wagon bridge with R.R. bridge in background, 1915."


Lyle-Balch Cemetery ...
Northwest of the town of Lyle is the Lyle-Balch Cemetery, established in pioneer days of the area. Burried here is not only James O. Lyle, namesake of the community, and Frederic Homer Balch, author of "Bridge of the Gods", but also early pony-express rider, wagon train leader, and Modoc War veteran Harry Lamont.

TRIBUTE TO DEAD AUTHOR
Stone to Mark Grave of F.H. Balch, Who Wrote "Bridge of the Gods."

"THE DALLES, Or., Sept. 25. -- (Special.) -- Forty members of The Dalles Historical Society will go to Lyle tomorrow, where memorial services will be held and a headstone placed at the grave of the late Rev. F.H. Balch, author of "The Bridge of the Gods." Mr. Balch lived for some years at Lyle, dividing his ministry between that place, Hood River and White Salmon, and at his death in 1901 was interred in the Lyle Cemetery. Until now his grave has been unmarked.

The headstone erected by the Historical Society is a tall boulder of native granite bearing the name, dates and the words: "The Bridge of the Gods."


Source:    "Morning Oregonian", September 26, 1908, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2017.


MARK AUTHOR'S GRAVE.
Author of "Bridge of the Gods" is Given Simple Honors."

"F.H. Balch, author of "The Bridge of the Gods," no longer lies in an unmarked grave at Lyle, Wash.

A rough gray granite slab, brought from the hills of Lyle, was chiseled by L. Comini, a marble cutter of The Dalles, Saturday, and placed at Balch's grave, in the little country cemetery three miles from Lyle. The work was done under the direction of the Historical Society of The Dalles.

A large assemblage of friends of the poet-preacher, Balch, ... met at the little school house near Lyle Saturday morning to honor the memory of the man, who wrote the "Bridge of the Gods", and witness the ceremonies at his unmarked grave. ... The school house in which the people met was built for a church in 1889 by F.H. Balch, who, as a Congretional minister, preached to his flock from the pulpit in that building. A tablet, bearing the inscription stating who caused the building to be erected, will be placed on the house so that those attending school there here-after may know who its builder was."


Source:    "La Grande Evening Observer" (La Grande, Oregon), September 29, 1908, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2017.


"The stone over the grave of Frederic Homer Balch is of rough, natural granite, quarried from the hills he loved."


Source:    "Sunday Oregonian", April 9, 1916, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2017.


Image, 2012, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2012.
Image, 2017, Balch Lake, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Frederic Homer Balch plaque, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken May 8, 2017.
Image, 2012, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Harry Lamont, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2012.

Harry Lamont, 1838-1921
"A rider for the Pony Express * He guided 12 wagon trains across the Plains and fought the Modoc Indian War of 1872-73 * A true pioneer"
Image, 2017, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Harry Lamont, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 13, 2017.
Image, 2017, Balch Lake, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken May 8, 2017.
Image, 2014, Scenic, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Western Bluebird, Lyle-Balch Cemetery, Lyle, Washington. Image taken March 12, 2014.


Lyle-Balch Church and Schoolhouse ...
Pine Hill Church, Pine Hill School, Balch School ...

According to C.J. Crandall, 1909 ("Frederic Homer Balch", IN: Oregon Teachers' Monthly):

"... in 1885 he [Frederic Homer Balch] took up the work as a Congregational missionary in Hood River valley, and also ministered to the church at White Salmon. He also assisted in building an edifice in the Lyle neighborhood, which he used for a church, and at his death, the school district took it over for a school house."

"There was no building for church services in the community. Rev. Whitcomb donated an acre of his land for a church site. The Congregational Missiouary Association contributed a fund and took charge of the work, while those of the neighborhood, who desired, helped with donations of lumber, labor, etc. In this latter class F.H. Balch was active and efficient.

When the building was completed, there was no minister to fill the pulpit, but being solicted he accepted the work, believing it to be his duty, he also occasionally filled the pulpit at White Salmon. He had felt the call to preach and was preparing himself by study for the work ...

His body was buried by the side of his sister, in the Lyle cemetery, not far from his former home, and near the Pine Hill Church where he had first wrought in the ministry. ...

The church at Pine Hill found no leader to carry on the work and was sold to the school district for a school house.

Years passed and the author slept in an unmarked grave. On September 24, 1908, friends ... with former neighbors ... and pupils from the Pine Hill School, joined with The Dalles Historical Association in memorial exercises for Frederic Homer Balch. A granite stone in its natural state had been procured and set on a concrete base by the neighbors ... the name of "Balch School" was conferred upon the building as a memorial of the work done there by him."


Source:    Delia M. Coon, 1924, "Frederick Homer Balch", IN: The Washington Historical Quarterly, p.32-43.


MARK AUTHOR'S GRAVE.
Author of "Bridge of the Gods" is Given Simple Honors."

"A large assemblage of friends of the poet-preacher, Balch, ... met at the little school house near Lyle Saturday morning to honor the memory of the man, who wrote the "Bridge of the Gods", and witness the ceremonies at his unmarked grave. ... The school house in which the people met was built for a church in 1889 by F.H. Balch, who, as a Congretional minister, preached to his flock from the pulpit in that building. A tablet, bearing the inscription stating who caused the building to be erected, will be placed on the house so that those attending school there here-after may know who its builder was."


Source:    "La Grande Evening Observer" (La Grande, Oregon), September 29, 1908, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2017.


Balch School, 1915 (Barbara Krohn and Associates, Statistics for the School Year, Washington Education Directory, 1915) ...

  • School: Balch (Lyle)
  • No. of district: 2
  • Enrollment: 42
  • Average dailty attendance: 32
  • High school enrollment: 1
  • No. months taught: 9
  • No. teachers required: 2
  • No. grades maintained: 11


Lyle Convict Road ...
[More]


Lyle Hotel ...
From the Lyle Hotel website (2011): "Built in 1905, the Lyle Hotel has had many lives, from professional offices (housing doctors and dentists), a carpenterís shop to a boarding house. The building has even been a private residence. Now, The Lyle Hotel has resumed its original purpose in providing comfortable lodging for visitors of the Columbia River Gorge and wonderful dining options to the public."

"A historic railroad hotel built in 1905, The Lyle Hotel, was instrumental in the construction of the SP & S Railway and developing industrial commerce and tourism in the Columbia River Gorge. Hosting industrialists, managers, workers and tourists the hotel has always been a gathering place of community and visitors. Lyle, Washington with its ferry boat landing and railway moving wool, wheat and other exports to Portland bustled with business and tourism from 1905 through the early 1970s when dam building was completed. Lyle in 1941 even had its very own airport.

Commerce has evolved in Lyle, grazing sheep have been replaced with rolling vineyards and outdoor enthusiasts. The former ferry landing teams with wind surfers and kite boarders and fishermen all times of the year. Traveling the scenic highways one can observe countless cyclists, mountain bikers, hikers, snow skiers, and bird watchers.

Today, The Lyle Hotel Restaurant & Bar, welcomes all who come to discover the beauty and activities of the Columbia River Gorge. The Columbia River and itís surrounding geology offer a home to world class vineyards, and sports activities, making the hotel an amazing place to come explore a diverse list of things to do in Lyle!,

Today the Lyle community is strong, full of founding families continuing to build and new settlers embracing the unique opportunities that this area has to offer. Whether a sportsman, explorer, rail enthusiast, fisherman, or lover of fine wine and good entertainment, all who visit The Lyle Hotel Restaurant & Bar will appreciate creating amazing memories here!


Source:    "TheLyleHotel.com" website, 2015.


Image, 2011, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle Hotel, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 4, 2011.
Image, 2011, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle Hotel, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 4, 2011.
Image, 2017, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle Hotel, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 13, 2017.
Image, 2017, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Eagle carving, Lyle Hotel, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 13, 2017.
Image, 2017, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Eagle carving, Lyle Hotel, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 13, 2017.


Lyle to Rowena Ferry ...
A small ferry crossed the Columbia River between Lyle, Washington, and Rowena, Oregon.


August 11, 1921:
"The wind was so strong several days that the Rowena-Lyle ferry east of here [Hood River] was forced to tie up. The gales had no effect on the big ferry of the Hood River-White Salmon Ferry Co."


Source:    "The Hood River Glacier", August 11, 1921, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


September 18, 1921:
"The Rowena-Lyle ferry [located] between Mosier and The Dalles. It is at the end of a rough and narrow road, two miles from the highway and is a seven-car boat. The charge is $1.05 for four passengers and car, 25 cents for each additional passenger."


Source:    "The Oregon Daily Journal", September 18, 1921, courtesy "Newspapers.com" website, 2016.

Map, 1933, Detail, Columbia River Highway at Rowena, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Map detail, Wasco County, 1933, Columbia River Highway at Rowena, Oregon. Metsker Map courtesy "HistoricMapWorks.com" website, 2016.
Map detail, 1950, Klickitat County, Washington, click to enlarge
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Klickitat County map detail, 1950, showing the North Bank Railroad (SP&S), the North Bank Highway (Route 8), and the area from Underwood to Lyle. Metsker Maps. Original map courtesy "HistoricMapWorks.com" website, 2016.

Underwood, White Salmon, Bingen, Vila, and Lyle ... the Hood River to White Salmon Bridge and the Rowena to Lyle Ferry.
Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Rowena Ferry Road, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Rowena Ferry Road, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.


Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission ...
All four Columbia River treaty tribes enjoy fishing rights along the Columbia from the Bonneville to McNary dams. This 147-mile stretch of the river is called Zone 6. The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) operates and maintains 31 fishing sites (2015, Note: the website map only shows 30 sites) in Zone 6. These sites were set aside by Congress to provide fishing locations to Indian fishers whose traditional fishing grounds were inundated behind dams.

"For fisheries management purposes, the 292-mile stretch of the Columbia River that creates the border between Washington and Oregon is divided into six zones. Zones 1-5 are between the mouth of the river and Bonneville Dam, a distance of 145 miles. Oregon and Washington manage the commercial fisheries that occur in these zones. Zone 6 is an exclusive treaty Indian commercial fishing area. This exclusion is for commercial fishing only. Non-commercial sports fishers may still fish in this stretch of the river." [Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016]

The Zone 6 sites include 19 Treaty Fishing Access sites (Bonneville, Wyeth, White Salmon, Stanley Rock, Lyle, Dallesport, Celilo, Maryhill, Rufus, Preacher's Eddy, North Shore, LePage Park, Pasture Point, Roosevelt Park, Pine Creek, Threemile Canyon, Alderdale, Crow Butte, and Faler Road), five "In-lieu" sites (Cascade Locks, Wind River, Cooks, Underwood, and Lone Pine), two "Shared-use" sites (Avery and Sundale Park, for both Tribal use and Public use), and four "Unimproved" sites with no services (Goodnoe, Rock Creek, Moonay, and Aldercreek).


Image, 2017, Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 13, 2017.
Image, 2017, Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 13, 2017.
Image, 2008, Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Washington, click to enlarge
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Lyle Treaty Fishing Access Site, Lyle, Washington. View from Rowena Crest, Oregon. Note Bald Eagle. Image taken August 23, 2008.


Mosier Syncline ...
The Mosier Syncline is the lowpoint between the Bingen Anticline to the west, and the Ortley Anticline to the east, and trends northeast between Mosier, Oregon, and Lyle, Washington.
[More]


Syncline Winery ...
The Syncline Winery, located northwest of Lyle, Washington, was named for the Mosier Syncline, whose N70E-trending axis runs south of the property.

Image, 2012, Syncline Winery, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Syncline Winery sign, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 15, 2012.


Trains and Tunnels ...

Image, 2011, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Tracks at Lyle, looking upstream (east), from bridge over tracks, Lyle, Washington. Image taken June 4, 2011.
Image, 2011, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Tunnels, Washington State Highway 14, east of Lyle, Washington. In Tunnel #7 traveling west, looking at east portal of Tunnel #6. Image taken June 4, 2011.
Image, 2011, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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East portal, Washington State Highway 14 tunnels, east of Lyle, Washington. View heading west at Tunnel #7 with east portal of Tunnel #6 visible. Image converted to black/white. Image taken June 4, 2011.


The Lyle Convict Road was located on the bench above today's Highway 14 tunnels.


Twin Bridges Museum ...
[More]

Image, 2015, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington. Image taken September 26, 2015.
Image, 2015, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Sign, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington. Image taken September 26, 2015.
Image, 2015, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Display, Button Quilt, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington. Image taken September 26, 2015.
Image, 2015, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Display, Lyle Convict Road, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington. Image taken September 26, 2015.
Image, 2015, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington, click to enlarge
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Display, Lyle Convict Camp, Twin Bridges Museum, Lyle, Washington. Image taken September 26, 2015.


Views of Lyle from across the Columbia ...

Image, 2004, Lyle, Washington, from Mayer State Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lyle, Washington, from Mayer State Park, Oregon. The main channel of the Columbia River is behind the islands. Image taken November 11, 2004.
Image, 2004, Lyle, Washington, from Mayer State Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lyle, Washington, from Mayer State Park, Oregon. The main channel of the Columbia River is behind the islands. Image taken November 11, 2004.
Image, 2008, Lyle, Washington, from Rowena Crest, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Boat ramp, Lyle, Washington, from Rowena Crest, Oregon. Image taken August 23, 2008.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards". The "Penny Postcard" became a popular way to send greetings to friends and family. The Penny Postcard today has become a snapshot of history.

Penny Postcard, Sheep, Klickitat Landing, 1899, click to enlarge
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Penny Postcard: Sheep waiting for ferry, Klickitat Landing, Washington, 1899. Penny Postcard, Image 1899, Postcard ca.1910, "Ferrying Sheep, Columbia River, Ore.". Caption for this image on the Oregon Historical Society Webpage is: "Sheep at the ferry, Klickitat Landing. Benjamin Gifford, 1899.". "Klickitat Landing" is today's Lyle, Washington. Published by the International Postcard Company, Portland, Oregon. Card #I-9. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 29, 1805 ...
A cloudy morning wind from the West but not hard, we Set out at day light [from their camp on Rocky Island at Crates Point], and proceeded on about five miles Came too on the Stard. Side at a village of 7 houses built in the Same form and materials of those above, here we found the Chief we had Seen at the long narrows [The Dalles] ...     they are hospitable and good humered Speak the Same language of the inhabitants of the last village, we call this the friendly village [vicinity of Dougs Beach]. ...     after brackfast we proceeded on, the mountains are high on each Side [high basalt cliffs of the Rowena Gap, with Rowena Crest on the south and the Chamberlain Lake area on the north], containing Scattering pine white oake & under groth, hill Sides Steep and rockey; at 4 miles lower we observed a Small river falling in with great rapidity on the Stard. Side [Klickitat River] below which is a village of 11 houses [today the town of Lyle is on the upstream side of the Klickitat], here we landed to Smoke a pipe with the nativs and examine the mouth of the river, which I found to be 60 yards wide rapid and deep, The inhabitants of the village are friendly and Chearfull; those people inform us also those at the last village that this little river is long and full of falls, no Salmon pass up it, it runs from N. N. E. that ten nations live on this river and its waters, on buries, and what game that Can kill with their Bow & arrows

we purchased 4 dogs and Set out- (this village is the of the Same nation of the one we last passed) and proceeded on The Countrey on each side begin to be thicker timbered with Pine and low white Oake; verry rockey and broken [passing Mayer State Park on the Oregon side]. passed three large rocks in The river the middle rock is large long and has Several Squar vaults on it. we call this rockey Island the Sepulchar [Memaloose Island] - The last river we passed we Shall Call the Cataract River [Klickitat River] from the number of falls which the Indians say is on it- passed 2 Lodges of Indians a Short distance below the Sepulchar Island [Memaloose Island] on the Stard. Side river wide, at 4 mile passed 2 houses on the Stard. Side, Six miles lower passed 4 houses above the mouth of a Small river 40 yards wide on the Lard. Side [Hood River]    a thick timbered bottom above & back of those houses; those are the first houses which we have Seen on the South Side of the Columbia River, (and the axess to those dificuelt) for fear of the approach of their common enemies the Snake Indians, passed 14 houses on the Std. Side Scattered on the bank- from the mouth of this little river which we shall Call Labeasche River [Hood River], the falls mountain [Mount Hood] is South and the top is covered with Snow.    one mile below pass the mouth of a large rapid Stream on the Stard. Side [White Salmon River], opposit to a large Sand bar [from Hood River], in this creek the Indians above take their fish, here we Saw Several canoes, which induced us to call this Canoe Creek [White Salmon River] it is 28 yards wide, about 4 miles lower and below the Sand bar [Hood River sandbar] is a butifull cascade falling over a rock of about 100 feet [Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, location of the Columbia Gorge Hotel],

[On the route map (Moulton, vol.1, map#78) a "C___ Spring" is shown on the north side of the river, today the location of Spring Creek and Spring Creek Fish Hatchery, with no mention of it in any text. On the south side, at the location of Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, only "Cascade" is labeled and "4 Houses of Indians".]

a Short distance lower passed 4 Indian houses on the Lard. Side in a timbered bottom, a fiew miles further we came too at 3 houses on Stard. Side, back of which is a pond [today the location of Drano Lake. The Little White Salmon River empties into Drano Lake.] in which I Saw Great numbers of Small Swan, Capt. Lewis and went into the houses of those people ...     Here the mountains are high on each Side, those to the Lard. Side has Some Snow on them at this time, more timber than above and of greater variety.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Barbara Krohn and Associates, Statistics for the School Year, Washington Education Directory, 1915;    Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016;    Coon, D.M., 1924, "Frederick Homer Balch", IN: The Washington Historical Quarterly, p.32-43.    Crandall, C.J., 1909, "Frederick Homer Balch", IN: "Oregon Teachers' Monthly", Volume 14.    Hitchman, R., 1985, Place Names of Washington, Washington State Historical Society;    Lyle Community website, 2004;    Lyle Hotel website, 2011, 2015;    U.S. Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office (GLO) Records database, 2008, 2017;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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May 2016