Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Cascade Locks, Oregon"
Includes ... Cascade Locks ... Cascade Locks Marine Park ... Thunder Island ... Campsite of October 30-31, 1805 ... Campsite of April 12, 1806 ... National Register of Historic Places ... Sternwheeler "Columbia Gorge" ...
Image, 2011, Looking upstream from Bridge of the Gods, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks as seen from Bridge of the Gods. Image taken May 20, 2011.


Cascade Locks ... (the Locks)
Cascade Locks is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River within the Bonneville Reservoir, at River Mile (RM) 149. It is located across from Ashes Lake, Rock Cove, and Stevenson, Washington. Downstream from Cascade Locks is the Bridge of the Gods, Ruckel Creek, and Eagle Creek. Upstream is Herman Creek, Government Cove, and the vanished community of Wyeth. Cascade Locks is located at the upstream end of Lewis and Clark's "Lower Falls of the Columbia", the "Cascade Rapids". In late October and early November 1805, and then again in mid-April 1806, the men had to portage their equipment around these rapids. In 1896 a navigational canal and locks were completed around these trecherous rapids and the town of "Cascade Locks" was born. In 1938 the Bonneville Dam was completed three miles downstream, and the rising waters of the Bonneville Reservoir inundated the canal and locks. Part of the canal is visible today as a tourist attraction and fishing pier. Today the Sternwheeler "Columbia Gorge" is based in Cascade Locks.

Cascade Locks ... (the Town)
The small community of Cascades Lock was developed by the federal government as they built the Cascade Locks. Work started on the locks in 1878, at which time the Cascade Locks post office was established, the community taking its name from the locks. While the locks were submerged early in 1938 with construction of the Bonneville Dam, the town remained safe.

Lewis and Clark and the Cascade Locks area ...
Lewis and Clark's campsites of October 30 and October 31, 1805, and April 12, 1806, were on an island off the Washington side of the Columbia, across from Cascade Locks, Oregon. They spent two nights at this spot on their trip down river as they portaged across the trecherous "Cascade Rapids", and one night on the return trip.
[More]

Image, 2004, Table Mountain from Bonneville Dam, North Bonneville, Washington click to enlarge
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Table Mountain and the Bonneville Landslide, Washington, as seen from Cascade Locks, Oregon. View towards the location of Lewis and Clark's campsites of October 30 and 31, 1805 and April 12, 1806, near Ashes Lake, Washington, at the upper end of the Bonneville Landslide. View from Thunder Island, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 4, 2004.


Cascade Locks Navigational Canal ...
"Congress appropriated money for a set of locks at the Cascades of the Columbia in 1876, but subsequent contractors proved to be exceedingly slow and dissatisfactory; in 1892 Day Contractors assumed the contract. In June of 1894, the largest Columbia River flood in modern history hit the area, and though the area's portage railroad was washed out, workmen and townspeople managed to save the locks. They were completed in 1896. Most of the Locks were subsequently flooded in 1938 by the construction of Bonneville Dam, just five miles downriver."


Source:    Washington State University, Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections website, 2018.

Before construction of locks were built past the Cascade Rapids and the Celilo Falls, passengers would have to exit one steamer, portage past the obstructions, and then board another steamer.

As written on the "AmericanWestSteamboat.com" website (2006):

"... Passengers and freight would travel the lower Columbia River to the Cascades on the Fashion, Carrie Ladd, Mountain Buck, or Julia. There they would put ashore and ride the portage railroad behind a tiny rail car, affectionately known as the Oregon Pony to the upper landing, where they would board the Idaho, Hassalo, or Wasco to The Dalles. There they would ride a horse drawn wagon for a short ride around Celilo Falls then board the Colonel Wright, Nez Perce Chief, Yakima, or Spray for a cruise to Lewiston on the Snake River. ..."

In 1878 construction of the 8-foot-deep Cascade Locks Navigation Canal began. It was completed on November 5, 1896, providing a way around the infamous Cascade Rapids, a section of the Columbia which had restricted navigation up the Columbia since the time of Lewis and Clark.

Forty-two years later, early in 1938, the canal was submerged under the rising waters of the Bonneville Reservoir, behind the Bonneville Dam.


Opening Day ...
Seven steamers were lined up to be the first through the Cascade Locks on November 5, 1896. They were the "Dalles City", "Harvest Queen", "Maria", "Regulator", "Sadie B.", "Sarah Dixon", and "Water Witch".

"... The opening of the Cascade Locks was an event paralleling in interest the forthcoming celebration when the Celilo Canal will be opened May 5. A picture was taken in 1896, showing the Harvest Queen, Sarah Dixon, Dalles City, Maria and the bow of the Regulator. The steamers Sadie B. and the Water Witch were also in the lock but the camera man missed them. ..."

[note: image not shown on this website]


Source:    "Morning Oregonian", March 14, 1915, University of Oregon website "Historic Oregon Newspapers", 2013


"... The locks were turned over to Captain W.L. Fisk, one of the corps of army engineers, by the contractors on November 5, 1896. The first boat to go through the locks was the "Sadie B.". The "Sadie B.", the "Danes City" ["Dalles City"], the "Sarah Dixon" and the "Harvest Queen" were put through the locks together. As they went through there was a continuous ovation. The "Sarah Dixon" had mounted a cannon her her deck and this was fired in salute. The "Harvest Queen" had on board four hundred excursionists. It turned around after passing through the locks and started back for Portland, thus being the first boat to make a round through the locks. ..."


Source:    S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1928, "History of the Columbia River Valley from The Dalles to the Sea", vol.III.

"Four steamers waiting their turn at the opening of Cascade Locks November 5, 1896. The steamers are identified as the 1) sternwheeler "Maria" which was built at Portland in 1887 and abandoned in 1923; 2) sternwheeler "Dalles City" which was built at Portland in 1891 and rebuilt in 1909; 3) sternwheeler "Harvest Queen" built at Celilo in 1878 and dismantled in 1899; and 4) sternwheeler "Sarah Dixon" which was built in 1892 and rebuilt in 1906. The original photograph is from the collection of Captain Werner Eckhart."

[note: image not shown on this website]


Source:    Ben Maxwell image collection, Salem Public Library Historic Photograph Collections, Salem Public Library, Salem, Oregon


Image, 2013, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, Oregon, under the I-5 Bridge, click to enlarge
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Model, "Harvest Queen", Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, Oregon. The "Harvest Queen" was one of four steamers to go through the Cascade Locks on opening day in 1896. Image taken May 8, 2013.


Early Images ...

Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Columbia River
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Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks, Columbia River, Oregon.
Penny Postcard, Undivided Back (1901-1907), "Cascade Locks, Columbia River.". Edward H. Mitchell, Publishers, San Francisco. Card #99. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Steamer entering Cascade Locks
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Penny Postcard: Steamer entering Cascade Locks, Oregon.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), Postmarked 1909, "Steamer entering Cascade Locks, Columbia River". Card printed in Germany, Card #10246. "The PCK Series". In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Columbia River
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Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks with the Bailey Gatzert and Dalles City, Columbia River, Oregon.
Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back (1907-1915, "Boats in Locks, Columbia River.". Published by The J.K. Gill Co., Portland, Oregon. Made in Germany. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Bailey Gatzert
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Penny Postcard: Steamer "Bailey Gatzert" entering the Cascade Locks, Oregon. Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Steamer Bailey Gatzert entering the Locks of the Cascades". Back: "On the Road of a Thousand Wonders". Published by M. Rieder, Los Angeles. Card #3941. Made in Germany. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Steamer entering Cascade Locks
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Penny Postcard: Steamer entering Cascade Locks, Oregon.
Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Cascade Locks, Oregon". View looking upstream. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Columbia River
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Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks, Columbia River, Oregon.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), Postmarked 1911, "Cascade Locks, Columbia River.". Litho Britton & Rey, San Francisco, California. Card #7015. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Steamer
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Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks, with steamer.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Cascade Locks, Columbia River". "On the Road of a Thousand Wonders." Published by M. Rieder, Los Angeles, California, Made in Germany. Card No.4027. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Steamers, including the Dalles City
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Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks, with steamers, including the "Dalles City".
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Cascade Locks, Columbia River. On the Line of the O.W.R. & N. Co.". Published by Portland Post Card Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #1297. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Columbia River
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks, Columbia River, Oregon.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1915-1930), "Cascade Locks, Columbia River.". Published by The Oregon News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #4562. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Cascade Locks, Ship heading upriver, ca.1920
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Penny Postcard: Cascade Locks, with steamer heading upriver.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1915-1930), "Cascade Locks, Columbia River, Oregon". Published by Lipschuetz & Katz, Portland, Oregon. Card #329. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Caption on back reads: "Cascade Locks, seen from the highway, constructed by the government at an expense of nearly $3,000,000.00 to overcome the unnavigable rapids of the Cascades. The locks raise steamers 20 feet and enables them to pass around the Cascades. The indian Legend has it that the rapids were formed by the fall of the fabled 'Bridge of the Gods"'and once spanned the Columbia River."


Views ...

Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Entering Cascade Locks, Oregon. View heading east. Image taken November 2, 2019.
Image, 2011, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks, heading west, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken January 1, 2011.
Image, 2010, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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The town of Cascade Locks, as seen from the Bridge of the Gods, Oregon. View from moving car heading north across Bridge of the Gods. Image taken March 6, 2010.
Image, 2012, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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The town of Cascade Locks, as seen from the Bridge of the Gods, Oregon. View from moving car heading north across Bridge of the Gods. Image taken May 11, 2012.
Image, 2011, Looking upstream from Bridge of the Gods, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks as seen from Bridge of the Gods. Image taken May 20, 2011.
Image, 2013, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Looking downsteam, Cascade Locks and Bridge of the Gods, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken February 15, 2013.
Image, 2013, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Looking upstream, Cascade Locks, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken February 15, 2013.
Image, 2011, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Fishing, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View looking downstream. Image taken July 2, 2011.
Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Western gate location, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 2, 2019.


Street Scenes ...

Image, 2011, Cascade Locks, street scene, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View from moving car. Image taken July 2, 2011.

The Pacific Crest Pub & Hostel was built in 1910.
Image, 2011, Cascade Locks, street scene, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View from moving car. Image taken July 2, 2011.

Big D's Service Station.
Image, 2011, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View from moving car heading west. Image taken November 9, 2011.
Image, 2015, Cascade Locks, WaPaNa Street and Forest Lane, click to enlarge
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WaPaNa Street and Forest Lane, Cascade Locks, Oregon. WaPaNa Street and Forest Lane were part of the original Columbia River Highway. View looking west. Image taken June 24, 2015.
Image, 2015, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2015.
Image, 2012, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View from moving car heading west. Image taken May 11, 2012.
Image, 2013, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Columbia Market, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken February 15, 2013.


Cascade Locks, etc.

  • Bridge of the Gods ...
  • Bridge of the Gods Model ...
  • "Cascade Lake" ...
  • Cascade Locks to Stevenson Ferry ...
  • Cascade Locks Tribal "In-lieu" Fishing Access Site ...
  • Eagle Creek Fire 2017 ...
  • Herman Creek Quarry ...
  • Historic Columbia River Highway ...
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
  • Locks Waterfront Grill (and Bigfoot) ...
  • Marina ...
  • Marine Park ...
  • Sternwheeler "Columbia Gorge" ...
  • Thunder Island ...


Bridge of the Gods ...
The Bridge of the Gods is located at Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 148, nearly three miles upstream of Bonneville Dam, and just downstream of the historic canal and locks at Cascade Locks. The bridge is located at the toe of the Table Mountain Landslide (Bonneville Landslide) which created the Cascade Rapids. The bridge is a cantilever bridge, 1,131 feet, with an overall bridge length of 1,858 feet. In 1938 the bridge was raised to accommodate the rising pool behind the Bonneville Dam. Currently the Bridge of the Gods is a toll bridge allowing motor and foot traffic, and it is the Columbia River crossing for the Pacific Crest Trail.
[More]

Image, 2004, Bridge of the Gods, as seen from Cascade Locks, click to enlarge
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Bridge of the Gods, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View of the Bridge of the Gods as seen from the locks at Cascade Locks. Image taken November 4, 2004.
Image, 2005, Bridge of the Gods, click to enlarge
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Bridge of the Gods, Cascade Locks, Oregon. From the Oregon side, looking across the Columbia River at the toe of the Table Mountain Landslide. Image taken May 13, 2005.
Image, 2006, Bridge of the Gods, click to enlarge
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Bridge of the Gods with reflection. View from Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken October 21, 2006.


Bridge of the Gods Model ...

Image, 2011, Bridge of the Gods Model, Cascade Locks, click to enlarge
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Decorated for Christmas, Bridge of the Gods Model, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken January 1, 2011.


"Cascade Lake" ...
LANCASTER SAYS LOCKS SHOULD BE CHANGED TO LAKE

"Speaking Monday before the noonday forum of the Portland chamber of commerce, Samuel C. Lancaster proposed that the name of Cascade Locks be changed to Cascade Lake. The change, he declared, would go far toward attracting attention to the fact that with completion of Bonneville dam Cascade Locks will nestle at the edge of one of the largest lakes in the west.

Mr. Lancaster proposed afterwards that stakes be set at once to show the height to which water will rise when the mammoth reservoir behind the dam becomes a reality.

In his talk he explained that Cascade Locks is above the high water line and told the Portland people of the opportunity here for a summer playground. ..."


Source:    "The Dam chronicle" (Cascade Locks, Or.), May 25, 1934, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2018.



Cascade Locks to Stevenson Ferry ...
During the late 1800s and early 1900s the ferry "Eva Jane" made the trip from Stevenson, Washington, to Cascade Locks, Oregon. The pilot wheel of the "Eva Jane" can be seen at the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center museum, located in Stevenson.

1919, Illustration, detail, Stevenson to Cascade Locks Ferry, click to enlarge
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ILLUSTRATION detail, 1919, showing the Stevenson to Cascade Locks ferry. "Sunday Oregonian", August 17, 1919, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2018.
Image, 2011, Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center, click to enlarge
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Exhibit, Pilot wheel of the ferry Eva Jane, Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center, Stevenson, Washington. Image taken July 15, 2011.


Cascade Locks Tribal "In-lieu" Fishing Access Site, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission ...
All four Columbia River treaty tribes enjoy fishing rights along the Columbia from the Bonneville to McNary dams. This 147-mile stretch of the river is called Zone 6. The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) operates and maintains 31 fishing sites (2015, Note: the website map only shows 30 sites) in Zone 6. These sites were set aside by Congress to provide fishing locations to Indian fishers whose traditional fishing grounds were inundated behind dams.

"For fisheries management purposes, the 292-mile stretch of the Columbia River that creates the border between Washington and Oregon is divided into six zones. Zones 1-5 are between the mouth of the river and Bonneville Dam, a distance of 145 miles. Oregon and Washington manage the commercial fisheries that occur in these zones. Zone 6 is an exclusive treaty Indian commercial fishing area. This exclusion is for commercial fishing only. Non-commercial sports fishers may still fish in this stretch of the river." [Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016]

The Zone 6 sites include 19 Treaty Fishing Access sites (Bonneville, Wyeth, White Salmon, Stanley Rock, Lyle, Dallesport, Celilo, Maryhill, Rufus, Preacher's Eddy, North Shore, LePage Park, Pasture Point, Roosevelt Park, Pine Creek, Threemile Canyon, Alderdale, Crow Butte, and Faler Road), five "In-lieu" sites (Cascade Locks, Wind River, Cooks, Underwood, and Lone Pine), two "Shared-use" sites (Avery and Sundale Park, for both Tribal use and Public use), and four "Unimproved" sites with no services (Goodnoe, Rock Creek, Moonay, and Aldercreek).



Eagle Creek Fire 2017 ...
The Eagle Creek Fire started on the afternoon of September 2, 2017, by some immature youths playing with fireworks. The fire quickly engulfed the Columbia Gorge behind Bonneville Dam. By September 5th the fire had moved west towards the Crown Point area. As of October 13, 2017, the fire had grown to 48,831 acres and was 50% contained, with areas from Cascade Locks to Troutdale being impacted.
[More]

Image, 2017, Cascade Locks from Stevenson, Washington, click to enlarge
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Government Cove, east of Cascade Locks, Oregon, as seen from Stevenson, Washington. Image taken September 11, 2017.
Image, 2017, Interstate 84, Eagle Creek Fire, click to enlarge
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Interstate 84 heading east, at Cascade Locks, Oregon. View from moving car just west of Cascade Locks. Image taken September 25, 2017.
Image, 2017, Cascade Locks, Eagle Creek Fire, click to enlarge
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"Thank-you Firefighters", Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken December 13, 2017.
Image, 2017, Cascade Locks, Eagle Creek Fire, click to enlarge
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"Thank-you Firefighters", Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken December 13, 2017.
Image, 2017, Cascade Locks, Eagle Creek Fire, click to enlarge
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"Thank-you Firefighters", Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken December 13, 2017.


Herman Creek Quarry ...
The Cascade Locks.

"Today's Oregonian says J.G. Day, jr., in charge of the affairs of the J.G. & I.N. Day Contracting Company, who have in hand the work of completing the canal and locks at the cascades, has completed arrangements for opening a basalt quarry at Herman creek, about three miles from the locks, and is expecting the arrival of machinery for equipping the quarry. As soon as the snow is off, the work of cutting basalt for the canal will begin. The granite is now being cut in the company's California's quarries, and all will be in readiness for putting in position after the high water in the Columbia subsides. Mr. Day is confident that the appropriation necessary for the completion of the locks will be passed by congress, and that the work will go on uninterruptedly to the end."


Source:    "The Dalles Weekly Chronicle", February 17, 1893, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2017.

[More]



Historic Columbia River Highway ...
[More Historic Columbia River Highway]
[More HCRH Route]

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Approaching Cascade Locks, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. View from west of Bridge of the Gods. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
[More Historic Columbia River Highway]
[More HCRH State Trail]

Image, 2014, John B. Yeon State Park, click to enlarge
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Trailhead, Cascade Locks, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Oregon. Image taken June 9, 2014.


Locks Waterfront Grill (and Bigfoot) ...
The original Bonneville Dam Visitor Center was called the "Bradford Island Visitor Center". It was replaced in the 1970s with a new visitor center (Oregon side). The leftover visitor center building was barged upriver to Cascade Locks where it is now the Cascade Locks Visitor Center and the Locks Waterfront Grill. Bigfoot lives on the back deck.

[More Bonneville Dam]
[More Bigfoot]


Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Locks Waterfront Grill, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 2, 2019.
Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bigfoot and the Locks Waterfront Grill, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 2, 2019.
Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bigfoot, Locks Waterfront Grill, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 2, 2019.


Marina ...

Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Marina, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 2, 2019.
Image, 2019, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Port of Cascade Locks/Marina, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken November 2, 2019.


Marine Park ...
Cascade Locks Marine Park is along the Columbia River at the location of the remains of the Cascade Locks, on the east side of the town. The park has picnic areas, a playground built like a sternwheeler, the Cascade Locks Historical Museum (housed in one of the 3 original locks tender's houses), and the Oregon Pony, the first steam engine in the Pacific Northwest. In September 2006 the park featured two life-size cutouts of "Seaman", Captain Lewis's newfoundland dog who made the entire journey with Lewis and Clark, and in 2011 two bronzes were dedicated, one of Sacagawea and Pomp, and the other of Captain Lewis's dog Seaman. There is also a walking bridge crossing the remains of the Locks, connecting the Marine Park with a 3-acre "Thunder Island". Cascade Locks Marine Park (and the Locks) was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 (Structure - #74001686).
[More]

Image, 2005, Cascade Locks Marine Park, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks Marine Park. View from bridge across the Locks to Thunder Island. Image taken June 29, 2005.
Image, 2009, Playground, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Playground, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Oregon. Image taken January 13, 2009.
Image, 2011, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bronze, Sacagawea, Cascade Locks Marine Park. Image taken May 4, 2011.
Image, 2009, Museum, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks Historical Museum, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Oregon. Image taken June 3, 2009.

The Cascade Locks Historical Museum is located in one of the three original locks tender's houses, built in 1905.
Image, 2006, Oregon Pony, click to enlarge
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Glass enclosure, "Oregon Pony", at Cascade Locks Marine Park, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken September 16, 2006.
Image, 2013, Oregon Pony, click to enlarge
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"Oregon Pony" in glass enclosure, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken May 19, 2013.


Sternwheeler "Columbia Gorge" ...
Four steamers were present when the Cascade Locks opened on November 5, 1896. Today the sternwheeler "Columbia Gorge" resides at the Cascade Locks, providing today's visitors with a glimpse into the past.
[More]

Image, 2011, Columbia Gorge Sternwheeler, click to enlarge
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"Columbia Gorge" Sternwheeler, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken July 2, 2011.
Image, 2011, Columbia Gorge Sternwheeler, click to enlarge
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"Columbia Gorge" Sternwheeler, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken July 2, 2011.


Thunder Island ...
[More]

Image, 2013, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Thunder Island, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Cascade Locks, Oregon. View looking east with the historic locks just visible on the right. Image taken February 15, 2013.
Image, 2013, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks from Thunder Island, Cascade Locks Marine Park, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken February 15, 2013.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards". The "Penny Postcard" became a popular way to send greetings to friends and family. Today the "Penny Postcard" has become a snapshot of history.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 30, 1805 ...





Clark, November 2, 1805 ...




Columbia River GorgeReturn to
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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • "A2ZGorge.info" website, 2006;
  • "AmericanWestSteamboat.com" website, 2006;
  • "CascadeLocks.net" website, 2004;
  • Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016;
  • Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2013, 2017, 2018;
  • National Register of Historic Places website, 2004, 2005;
  • Oregon Historic Photograph Collection website, 2006;
  • Oregon Museums Association website, 2009;
  • Port of Cascade Locks website, 2011;
  • Washington State University, Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections website, 2018;


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/cascade_locks.html
October 2017